A place to gather and share information about the Thomas Willcox and Elizabeth Cole Willcox Family of Ivy Mills, PA. For more information see the Home page link above or contact Deniane Kartchner at Denianek@gmail.com. My husband is a descendant of Thomas and Elizabeth's son James who married Prudence Doyle. Their son John's daughter Prudence married John Christopher Kartchner.

Note: This is a work in progress! I am trying to verify everything before I post, but feel free to send me corrections and/or suggestions. It’s also not a complete history of Ivy Mills or a website for current operations, although I will gladly try to answer any questions and/or lead you to the right information.

James Willcox property in Upper Providence, PA


JAMES WILLCOX PROPERTY IN UPPER PROVIDENCE, PA

The tax records here give a great account of how long Prudence Wilcox kept the mill and homestead after James died.
Information about the four categories of taxables can be found here:
There are four categories of taxables:
  1. landholder – held land by lease or deed (PA taxed the occupant)
  2. inmate – married or widowed, landless (contract labor)
  3. freeman – single, free man at least 21 years of age (as of 1718). Had to be out of servitude or apprenticeship at least 6 months at time of tax. Taxation of freemen was inconsistent. It appears that before 1755 single men living with their parents were not taxed.
  4. nonresident landowner – owner of unseated (unoccupied) land
Year
Name
Tax
Acres
Animals
Servant
Misc.
1762
James Wilcox
2-9




1763
James Wilcox
0, 8, 6




1764
James Willcox

Dwelling & 50 Acres
2 Mares & 2 Cattle


1765
James Wilcox

50
2 Horses, 2 Cattle


1766
James Wilcox

50
2 Horses, 4 Cattle
1 Servant
Saw Mill, Paper Mill
1767
James Wilcox

52
3 Horses, 3 Cattle
1 Servant
Paper & Saw Mill
1768
James Wilcox

53
1 Horse, 4 Cattle

Saw & Paper Mill
1769
James Wilcox

53


Paper Mill
1770
Prudence Wilcox

46 Acres Land
2 Horses, 3 Sheep, 2 Cattle

Paper Mill
1771
Prudence Wilcox

51
1 Horse

Paper Mill & Saw Mill
1772
Prudence Wilcox

58 Acres & Buildings
1 Horse, 8 Cattle, 5 Sheep


1773
Prudy Wilcox

50 Acres Land & Buildings
1 Horse, 2 Cattle, 4 Sheep


1774
Prudence Wilcox

40
1 Horse, 1 Cow

*Thomas Bishop listed as owning all “Grist Mill & Saw Mills”
1775
Prudence Wilcox

60 Acres Land & Buildings
2 Horses, 2 Cattle

No Mills Listed At All
1776
Prudence Wilcox
1-9




1777
NOTHING LISTED FOR ANYONE





1778
Prudence Wilcox

50 Acres Land & Buildings
1 Horse, 1 Cow

Thomas Bishop Saw Mill
1779
Prudence Wilcox

40
2 Cattle

TB Mill
1780
Prudence Wilcox

40
2 Cattle


1781
Thomas Wilcox

50
Horse, 8 Cattle

Juror (12 total, 22 non jurors)
1782
Thomas Wilcox

52 Acres & Improvements
1 Horse & 1 Cow

TB saw and grist mills
1783
NO RECORDS





1784
NO RECORDS





1785
J. Wilcox

5 Acres of Land
1 Horse

James Bishop took over grist and saw mills
1786
Thomas Wilcox

5 Acres Land & Buildings
1 Horse, 1 Cow

John Lungrin, paper mill
1787
NO RECORDS





1788
GONE




John Luingrin, paper mill, grist & saw mill Samuel Vernon
1790
GONE




John Lingrin







SOLD THE MILL IN 1785 – IT APPARENTLY WAS OWNED BY MARK WILCOX AT THIS TIME.
ABOUT MR. LUNGREN:
A history of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, and its people, Volume 2
 By John Woolf Jordan, Lewis Historical Publishing Co
p. 699 – Mr. Lungren became a papermaker and by an act of the Continental Congress, July 19, 1776, he, with all other papermakers of Pennsylvania, was excused from military services. In 1779 he was registered as a taxable inmate of Concord Township, Chester county (now Delaware county), being employed in the Wilcox Paper Mill on the west branch of Chester Creek. This was the second paper mill built in Pennsylvania, it having been erected in 1727, and called Ivy Mill, and in it was made for one hundred years all the paper used for continental and national government paper money.”
p. 699, “He [John Lungren] purchased a paper mill site and fifty-three acres of land from Mark Wilcox, April 20, 1785, retaining this property until December 30, 1795, when he disposed of it to William Levis. This mill site was on Ridley Creek in Upper Providence, and was for many years known as “Bancroft’s Upper Bank.”


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